Diving Into the Zeitgeist Abyss.

"The world is spinning too fast, And I'm buying Nike shoes To keep myself tethered To the days I tried to lose." - 2D

2,592 notes

arabellesicardi:

The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, 

The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, 

The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, 

(via la-xingada)

3,417 notes

ratak-monodosico:

Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 

But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

(Source: child-of-thecosmos, via room42)

8,330 notes

moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV! So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV!
So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

(Source: highkeygay, via little-miss-shayla)

317 notes

descentintotyranny:

Snowden Says NSA Employees ‘Routinely’ Passed Around Naked Photos That Had Been Intercepted
July 18 2014
One of the repeated talking points by the NSA for years has been about how there are all these “strict controls” on who has access to data and how it’s used. We’ve seen pretty clear evidence that the NSA’s definition of “strict controls” (like so many NSA definitions of plain English words and phrases) is different than what most people consider “strict controls.” After all, it insisted for months that Snowden didn’t have any access to actual surveillance data… until it was revealed that he did. There were also all those cases of flagrant abuses of the NSA’s system that were revealed last fall. The NSA pretended this showed how good they were at catching anyone who abused the system, but the details suggested otherwise. Many of the “caught” abuses only came out years later when the people who abused the systems to spy on lovers and friends admitted to it during interviews.  Keith Alexander insisted that the NSA had “100% audibility” of the actions of their employees and they made sure that no one abused their powers:

 “The assumption is our people are just out there wheeling and dealing. Nothing could be further from the truth. We have tremendous oversight over these programs. We can audit the actions of our people 100%, and we do that,” he said.  Addressing the Black Hat convention in Las Vegas, an annual gathering for the information security industry, he gave a personal example: “I have four daughters. Can I go and intercept their emails? No. The technical limitations are in there.” Should anyone in the NSA try to circumvent that, in defiance of policy, they would be held accountable, he said: “There is 100% audibility.” 

Of course, that doesn’t explain why so many of the “LOVINT” cases only came out after people self-confessed many years later, rather than through any audits.  Meanwhile, in the latest Ed Snowden interview (done with the Guardian’s Alan Rusbridger), Snowden reveals that NSA employees routinely would share naked photos that had been intercepted:

 “You’ve got young enlisted guys, 18 to 22 years old,” Snowden said. “They’ve suddenly been thrust into a position of extraordinary responsibility where they now have access to all of your private records. In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work in any sort of necessary sense. For example, an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising position. But they’re extremely attractive.  “So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and show their co-worker. The co-worker says: ‘Hey that’s great. Send that to Bill down the way.’ And then Bill sends it to George and George sends it to Tom. And sooner or later this person’s whole life has been seen by all of these other people. It’s never reported. Nobody ever knows about it because the auditing of these systems is incredibly weak. The fact that your private images, records of your private lives, records of your intimate moments have been taken from your private communications stream from the intended recipient and given to the government without any specific authorization without any specific need is itself a violation of your rights. Why is that in a government database?”  Then Alan Rusbridger, The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, asked: “You saw instances of that happening?”  “Yeah,” Snowden responded.  “Numerous?”  “It’s routine enough, depending on the company that you keep, it could be more or less frequent. These are seen as the fringe benefits of surveillance positions.” 

Of course, none of this is really that new. Way back in 2008, you may recall, that it was revealed that NSA analysts were listening in on pillow talk phone calls between Americans overseas and loved ones back home… and sharing those recordings around the office:

 Not only were calls between Americans listened to and recorded on a regular basis, the “good parts” (i.e., phone sex) were sent around to other operators to listen to as well. One of the operators said that on a regular basis messages would be sent around with messages like: “Hey, check this out. There’s good phone sex or there’s some pillow talk, pull up this call, it’s really funny, go check it out.” 

That was revealed years before Snowden even worked for the NSA. It would appear that little has changed.

descentintotyranny:

Snowden Says NSA Employees ‘Routinely’ Passed Around Naked Photos That Had Been Intercepted

July 18 2014

One of the repeated talking points by the NSA for years has been about how there are all these “strict controls” on who has access to data and how it’s used. We’ve seen pretty clear evidence that the NSA’s definition of “strict controls” (like so many NSA definitions of plain English words and phrases) is different than what most people consider “strict controls.” After all, it insisted for months that Snowden didn’t have any access to actual surveillance data… until it was revealed that he did. There were also all those cases of flagrant abuses of the NSA’s system that were revealed last fall. The NSA pretended this showed how good they were at catching anyone who abused the system, but the details suggested otherwise. Many of the “caught” abuses only came out years later when the people who abused the systems to spy on lovers and friends admitted to it during interviews.

Keith Alexander insisted that the NSA had “100% audibility” of the actions of their employees and they made sure that no one abused their powers:

“The assumption is our people are just out there wheeling and dealing. Nothing could be further from the truth. We have tremendous oversight over these programs. We can audit the actions of our people 100%, and we do that,” he said.

Addressing the Black Hat convention in Las Vegas, an annual gathering for the information security industry, he gave a personal example: “I have four daughters. Can I go and intercept their emails? No. The technical limitations are in there.” Should anyone in the NSA try to circumvent that, in defiance of policy, they would be held accountable, he said: “There is 100% audibility.”

Of course, that doesn’t explain why so many of the “LOVINT” cases only came out after people self-confessed many years later, rather than through any audits.

Meanwhile, in the latest Ed Snowden interview (done with the Guardian’s Alan Rusbridger), Snowden reveals that NSA employees routinely would share naked photos that had been intercepted:

“You’ve got young enlisted guys, 18 to 22 years old,” Snowden said. “They’ve suddenly been thrust into a position of extraordinary responsibility where they now have access to all of your private records. In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work in any sort of necessary sense. For example, an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising position. But they’re extremely attractive.

“So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and show their co-worker. The co-worker says: ‘Hey that’s great. Send that to Bill down the way.’ And then Bill sends it to George and George sends it to Tom. And sooner or later this person’s whole life has been seen by all of these other people. It’s never reported. Nobody ever knows about it because the auditing of these systems is incredibly weak. The fact that your private images, records of your private lives, records of your intimate moments have been taken from your private communications stream from the intended recipient and given to the government without any specific authorization without any specific need is itself a violation of your rights. Why is that in a government database?”

Then Alan Rusbridger, The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, asked: “You saw instances of that happening?”

“Yeah,” Snowden responded.

“Numerous?”

“It’s routine enough, depending on the company that you keep, it could be more or less frequent. These are seen as the fringe benefits of surveillance positions.”

Of course, none of this is really that new. Way back in 2008, you may recall, that it was revealed that NSA analysts were listening in on pillow talk phone calls between Americans overseas and loved ones back home… and sharing those recordings around the office:

Not only were calls between Americans listened to and recorded on a regular basis, the “good parts” (i.e., phone sex) were sent around to other operators to listen to as well. One of the operators said that on a regular basis messages would be sent around with messages like: “Hey, check this out. There’s good phone sex or there’s some pillow talk, pull up this call, it’s really funny, go check it out.”

That was revealed years before Snowden even worked for the NSA. It would appear that little has changed.

(via tr0tskitty)